Dr Mark Ingham

Ingham makes site-specific art installations that in practice and theory explore ideas of autobiographical memory and its relationships with photographic images. ‘120 Days and Nights of Staggering and Stammering’ is an installation made up of multiple SLR cameras modified to create photographic projectors. The projected photographic images are an exploration into experiences of remembering and forgetting. 

For Mark, photographic images are a testament to our complex and elusive past. The idea that photography has altered our perception of the past, and even the perception of time itself, is central to this work. For Mark, photographic images are seen as a living ghost of the past, here and not here at the same time, something which creates a fundamental shift in the way the world is perceived and conceived. These installations are an attempt to express some of these ideas and further illuminate the relationships between photographic images and the construction of our autobiographical memories.

Mark has completed an AHRC funded practice-led PhD at Goldsmiths College, University of London in 2005. Mark studied BA Sculpture at Chelsea School of Art and Design and then went to the Slade School of Fine Art for his postgraduate studies. Mark was then awarded the Henry Moore Foundation Fellowship at Camberwell School of Arts and Crafts.

Mark is currently Contextual and Theoretical Studies Coordinator in the Spatial Communication/CTS programme at LCC and a PhD Director of Studies and Supervisor at UAL and AUB. Mark is the External Examiner for the Design Cluster at London Metropolitan University and BA Animation. Mark is also the external examiner at Middlesex University for the Visual Context and Theory Department for the Design Dissertations.

Mark has exhibited widely, both in the UK and internationally. Most recently, Mark was in a group show organised by Curating Video entitled EPISODE at temporarycontemporary, London, which then travelled to Leeds and Miami. Mark also created an installation at Dilston Grove for Cafe Gallery Projects entitled ‘Ars Magna Lucis et Umbrae’ which was funded by an individual grant from Arts Council England.

As an artist, Mark is excited by the dynamic relationships between research, theory and practice.

www.markingham.org

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Dr Mark Ingham

Ingham makes site-specific art installations that in practice and theory explore ideas of autobiographical memory and its relationships with photographic images. ‘120 Days and Nights of Staggering and Stammering’ is an installation made up of multiple SLR cameras modified to create photographic projectors. The projected photographic images are an exploration into experiences of remembering and forgetting. 

For Mark, photographic images are a testament to our complex and elusive past. The idea that photography has altered our perception of the past, and even the perception of time itself, is central to this work. For Mark, photographic images are seen as a living ghost of the past, here and not here at the same time, something which creates a fundamental shift in the way the world is perceived and conceived. These installations are an attempt to express some of these ideas and further illuminate the relationships between photographic images and the construction of our autobiographical memories.

Mark has completed an AHRC funded practice-led PhD at Goldsmiths College, University of London in 2005. Mark studied BA Sculpture at Chelsea School of Art and Design and then went to the Slade School of Fine Art for his postgraduate studies. Mark was then awarded the Henry Moore Foundation Fellowship at Camberwell School of Arts and Crafts.

Mark is currently Contextual and Theoretical Studies Coordinator in the Spatial Communication/CTS programme at LCC and a PhD Director of Studies and Supervisor at UAL and AUB. Mark is the External Examiner for the Design Cluster at London Metropolitan University and BA Animation. Mark is also the external examiner at Middlesex University for the Visual Context and Theory Department for the Design Dissertations.

Mark has exhibited widely, both in the UK and internationally. Most recently, Mark was in a group show organised by Curating Video entitled EPISODE at temporarycontemporary, London, which then travelled to Leeds and Miami. Mark also created an installation at Dilston Grove for Cafe Gallery Projects entitled ‘Ars Magna Lucis et Umbrae’ which was funded by an individual grant from Arts Council England.

As an artist, Mark is excited by the dynamic relationships between research, theory and practice.

www.markingham.org