2013 Community Matters

Community Matters: Photography Collectives of the 1970s, and Today
Thursday, 23rd May, 2013, 1.30 – 5.30pm
The Swedenborg Hall, 20-21 Bloomsbury Way, London WC1A 2TH
Community Matters: Photography Collectives of the 1970s, and
Today
Paul Trevor, Mozart Street, Toxteth, Liverpool, 1975
This study afternoon brings together those who were involved in, and those who are
researching, photographic projects and collectives of the 1970s. In order to provide a
contemporary perspective, there are contributions from those involved in contemporary
‘community’ photography projects. This will stimulate debate on the ways in which these
groups and collectives viewed concepts of collaboration, engagement and empowerment
within community, together with a willingness to experiment with modes of production,
distribution and exhibition. This raises questions of agency: who is taking the pictures
and for whom within the community?
This event is programmed by Noni Stacey, an AHRC-funded research student,
attached to the UAL Photography and the Archive Research Centre. This afternoon
has been organised by Photography and the Archive Research Centre as part of the
Moose on the Loose Biennale of Research
Community Matters: Photography Collectives of the 1970s, and Today
Thursday, 23rd May, 2013, 1.30 – 5.30pm
The Swedenborg Hall, 20-21 Bloomsbury Way, London WC1A 2TH
2
1.30 - 1.40 Introduction by Professor Val Williams
1.45 - 2.10 Noni Stacey ‘Making the Invisible Visible: The work of the Hackney
Flashers in London in the 1970s’. Talk + Q&A
2.15 - 2.40 Malcolm Dickson, director Street Level Photoworks, Glasgow, on the
Red Road community photography project. Talk + Q&A
2.50 - 3.10 Tea and cakes (tea available form nearby cafes)
3.15 – 3.45 Noni Stacey in conversation with Paul Trevor, photographer,
member of Exit Photography Group and founder member of the
radical photo journal Camerawork. Talk + Q&A
3.50 - 4.10 Jess Baines, on radical printshops of the 1970s, ‘Experiments in
democratic participation: feminist printshop collectives’. Talk + Q&A
4.15 – 4.40 Ingrid Guyon, Valentina Schivardi and David Kendall talk about
their work with Fotosynthesis, ‘Reflexive Disclosure: Process,
Practice and Projects - Fotosynthesis 2009 – 2013’. Talk + Q&A
4.45 – 5.15 Screening of documentary about a revolutionary commune in
London in the 1970s, ‘Wild Things’. This film was produced and
directed by Adam Hopkins
5.20 – 5.30 The Moose on the Loose Biennale of Research comes to an end
Community Matters: Photography Collectives of the 1970s, and Today
Thursday, 23rd May, 2013, 1.30 – 5.30pm
The Swedenborg Hall, 20-21 Bloomsbury Way, London WC1A 2TH
3
Biographies
Noni Stacey
Noni Stacey is a PhD research student attached to the UAL Photography and the Archive
Research Centre working under the supervision of Professor Val Williams. She is
researching the history of ‘community photography’ in Britain in the 1970s, building on
research carried out for her MA dissertation. She completed her MA in the history and
theory of photography at Sotheby’s Institute of Art in 2010.
Excerpts of her dissertation, ‘Community Photography in Britain in the 1970s:
Photography, Pedagogy and Dreams’, were published by the National Media Museum’s
online Archive magazine in 2011: http://www.archivemagazine.org.uk/?p=515. Her
main interests concern the intersection between politics and photography and the role of
photography outside of the gallery. Before returning to education, she worked as a
freelance picture editor and researcher on newspapers and magazines, working on
Guardian Weekend magazine, The Guardian and The Independent on Sunday, among
others. She commissioned photographers and researched pictures for news, arts and
lifestyle stories. She has also worked as a TV news producer and journalist.
Paul Trevor
Paul Trevor is a London based photographer/film maker currently working in Spain. His
photo book projects include: Down Wapping, 1974; Survival Programmes, 1982;
Constant Exposure, 1987; Sleeper, 1993; Fotomo Blues, 1997; In Your Face, 2000; Eye
Pod, 2003; Dreams of Fire, 2005; Like You've Never Been Away, 2011. Between 1973
and 2000, he produced the Eastender Archive, an extensive personal record of the
changing community near his home in Brick Lane, in the East End of London. A book
from the Archive is to be published next year by Aperture. Paul Trevor attended the
National Film & Television School. He was a founder member of the Exit Photography
Group and the Half Moon Photography Workshop - publisher of the influential
Camerawork magazine. Paul Trevor's photographs have been exhibited internationally
since the 1970s and are in public and private collections around the world. His website is
www.paultrevor.com
Jess Baines
Jess Baines is a part-time research student in the Media & Communications department
at LSE (London School of Economics). Her research focus is the network of radical and
community print shops that proliferated across the UK (and elsewhere) between the late
1960s and early 1980s. Since 2003 she has also been a lecturer in the Faculty of Design
at London College of Communication, UAL.
Fotosynthesis
Fotosynthesis is a Lambeth-based group that uses participatory photography to give a
voice to people, develop skills and encourage social cohesion. Fotosynthesis runs a
darkroom and a studio space to offer a platform for self-expression where both
community groups and individuals can access affordable photography training and
facilities www.http://www.fotosynthesiscommunity.org.uk/
Ingrid Guyon, Valentina Schivardi, David Kendall of Fotosynthesis, will be talking
about their work: Reflexive Disclosure – Process, Practice and Projects -
Fotosynthesis 2009 - 2013
Community Matters: Photography Collectives of the 1970s, and Today
Thursday, 23rd May, 2013, 1.30 – 5.30pm
The Swedenborg Hall, 20-21 Bloomsbury Way, London WC1A 2TH
4
Ingrid Guyon was born in Arles, France and has lived and worked as a photographer,
community worker and photography facilitator in London for eleven years. In 2009
Ingrid used her expertise and connections within diverse communities in London to
establish Fotosynthesis. Her aim was to encourage social inclusion and participation
through photography, and to keep traditional and experimental photography processes
alive. Ingrid is a director of Fotosynthesis and continues to undertake photographic
assignments around the world.
Valentina Schivardi grew up in Italy and studied photography at the C.F.P. Bauer of
Milan. After her graduation she moved to New York to develop and expand her
photographic portfolio and worked as a teaching assistant at the International Center of
Photography. In 2006 she moved to London and undertook an MA in Photojournalism
and Documentary Photography at LCC, University of the Arts London. In 2010 she joined
Fotosynthesis, as a director where she is developing her interest in documentary
photography and participatory methods.
David Kendall's photography and research explore how spatial, economic and design
initiatives, as well as participatory practices, combine to encourage social and spatial
interconnections or conflict in cities. He is a graduate of LCC, University of the Arts
London, and Goldsmiths, University of London, where he studied photography and urban
sociology. His photographs, spatial research and collaborative projects have featured in
exhibitions, festivals, conferences and symposia at museums and academic institutions
worldwide. David designs advocacy projects, conducts qualitative research, spatial
engagement and consultation strategies and implements media campaigns. He facilitates
workshops with NGOs, charities, architects, media and educational organisations
including Goldsmiths, University of London, UAL, Age UK, Groundswell, Lifeline and
Tower Hamlets Drug Action Team. David is a director of Fotosynthesis and is a visiting
research fellow at Goldsmiths, University of London.
Adam Hopkins is the producer and director of the documentary ‘Wild Things’. ‘In the
early 1970s a group of idealistic young adults converted a regular north London house
into a revolutionary commune. Their children would not belong to anybody – they would
be free. As part of this new way of life, the children were not given their father’s
surname, they were all given a new name, ‘Wild’ (Raw TV). This film was shown on
Channel 4 in 2009. Noni Stacey would like to thank Adam Hopkins and Lucy Willis at
Raw TV for giving LCC permission to show this film.
Moose on the Loose, the first Biennale of Research, organised by the UAL Photography
and the Archive Research Centre (PARC) explores and celebrates photography research
in and around the University of the Arts London. It includes exhibitions, conversations,
study days, films, research meetings, preview parties and launches. The Biennale will be
held at the London College of Communication (LCC) and at venues across London in May
2013. Among the Biennale’s themes are research into war and conflict, women’s
photography in the 1990s, the history and legacy of community and photography in the
1970s, photography and queerness and photography and the contemporary imaginary.
Beginning with the opening of the exhibitions Closer and A Model War, the Biennale
explores the process and the manifestation of the ever-changing and developing research
landscape. www.mooseontheloose.net
Moose was directed by Val Williams, creatively produced by Wendy Short and organised
by Monica Takvam and Brigitte Lardinois

 

Rolling Sisters by Lenthall Road Workshop (image courtesy Jess Baines)
Our Body by See Red Women's Workshop (image courtesy Jess Baines)

Download PDF: Community Matters – Photography Collectives of the 1970s, and Today

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2013 Community Matters

Community Matters: Photography Collectives of the 1970s, and Today
Thursday, 23rd May, 2013, 1.30 – 5.30pm
The Swedenborg Hall, 20-21 Bloomsbury Way, London WC1A 2TH
Community Matters: Photography Collectives of the 1970s, and
Today
Paul Trevor, Mozart Street, Toxteth, Liverpool, 1975
This study afternoon brings together those who were involved in, and those who are
researching, photographic projects and collectives of the 1970s. In order to provide a
contemporary perspective, there are contributions from those involved in contemporary
‘community’ photography projects. This will stimulate debate on the ways in which these
groups and collectives viewed concepts of collaboration, engagement and empowerment
within community, together with a willingness to experiment with modes of production,
distribution and exhibition. This raises questions of agency: who is taking the pictures
and for whom within the community?
This event is programmed by Noni Stacey, an AHRC-funded research student,
attached to the UAL Photography and the Archive Research Centre. This afternoon
has been organised by Photography and the Archive Research Centre as part of the
Moose on the Loose Biennale of Research
Community Matters: Photography Collectives of the 1970s, and Today
Thursday, 23rd May, 2013, 1.30 – 5.30pm
The Swedenborg Hall, 20-21 Bloomsbury Way, London WC1A 2TH
2
1.30 - 1.40 Introduction by Professor Val Williams
1.45 - 2.10 Noni Stacey ‘Making the Invisible Visible: The work of the Hackney
Flashers in London in the 1970s’. Talk + Q&A
2.15 - 2.40 Malcolm Dickson, director Street Level Photoworks, Glasgow, on the
Red Road community photography project. Talk + Q&A
2.50 - 3.10 Tea and cakes (tea available form nearby cafes)
3.15 – 3.45 Noni Stacey in conversation with Paul Trevor, photographer,
member of Exit Photography Group and founder member of the
radical photo journal Camerawork. Talk + Q&A
3.50 - 4.10 Jess Baines, on radical printshops of the 1970s, ‘Experiments in
democratic participation: feminist printshop collectives’. Talk + Q&A
4.15 – 4.40 Ingrid Guyon, Valentina Schivardi and David Kendall talk about
their work with Fotosynthesis, ‘Reflexive Disclosure: Process,
Practice and Projects - Fotosynthesis 2009 – 2013’. Talk + Q&A
4.45 – 5.15 Screening of documentary about a revolutionary commune in
London in the 1970s, ‘Wild Things’. This film was produced and
directed by Adam Hopkins
5.20 – 5.30 The Moose on the Loose Biennale of Research comes to an end
Community Matters: Photography Collectives of the 1970s, and Today
Thursday, 23rd May, 2013, 1.30 – 5.30pm
The Swedenborg Hall, 20-21 Bloomsbury Way, London WC1A 2TH
3
Biographies
Noni Stacey
Noni Stacey is a PhD research student attached to the UAL Photography and the Archive
Research Centre working under the supervision of Professor Val Williams. She is
researching the history of ‘community photography’ in Britain in the 1970s, building on
research carried out for her MA dissertation. She completed her MA in the history and
theory of photography at Sotheby’s Institute of Art in 2010.
Excerpts of her dissertation, ‘Community Photography in Britain in the 1970s:
Photography, Pedagogy and Dreams’, were published by the National Media Museum’s
online Archive magazine in 2011: http://www.archivemagazine.org.uk/?p=515. Her
main interests concern the intersection between politics and photography and the role of
photography outside of the gallery. Before returning to education, she worked as a
freelance picture editor and researcher on newspapers and magazines, working on
Guardian Weekend magazine, The Guardian and The Independent on Sunday, among
others. She commissioned photographers and researched pictures for news, arts and
lifestyle stories. She has also worked as a TV news producer and journalist.
Paul Trevor
Paul Trevor is a London based photographer/film maker currently working in Spain. His
photo book projects include: Down Wapping, 1974; Survival Programmes, 1982;
Constant Exposure, 1987; Sleeper, 1993; Fotomo Blues, 1997; In Your Face, 2000; Eye
Pod, 2003; Dreams of Fire, 2005; Like You've Never Been Away, 2011. Between 1973
and 2000, he produced the Eastender Archive, an extensive personal record of the
changing community near his home in Brick Lane, in the East End of London. A book
from the Archive is to be published next year by Aperture. Paul Trevor attended the
National Film & Television School. He was a founder member of the Exit Photography
Group and the Half Moon Photography Workshop - publisher of the influential
Camerawork magazine. Paul Trevor's photographs have been exhibited internationally
since the 1970s and are in public and private collections around the world. His website is
www.paultrevor.com
Jess Baines
Jess Baines is a part-time research student in the Media & Communications department
at LSE (London School of Economics). Her research focus is the network of radical and
community print shops that proliferated across the UK (and elsewhere) between the late
1960s and early 1980s. Since 2003 she has also been a lecturer in the Faculty of Design
at London College of Communication, UAL.
Fotosynthesis
Fotosynthesis is a Lambeth-based group that uses participatory photography to give a
voice to people, develop skills and encourage social cohesion. Fotosynthesis runs a
darkroom and a studio space to offer a platform for self-expression where both
community groups and individuals can access affordable photography training and
facilities www.http://www.fotosynthesiscommunity.org.uk/
Ingrid Guyon, Valentina Schivardi, David Kendall of Fotosynthesis, will be talking
about their work: Reflexive Disclosure – Process, Practice and Projects -
Fotosynthesis 2009 - 2013
Community Matters: Photography Collectives of the 1970s, and Today
Thursday, 23rd May, 2013, 1.30 – 5.30pm
The Swedenborg Hall, 20-21 Bloomsbury Way, London WC1A 2TH
4
Ingrid Guyon was born in Arles, France and has lived and worked as a photographer,
community worker and photography facilitator in London for eleven years. In 2009
Ingrid used her expertise and connections within diverse communities in London to
establish Fotosynthesis. Her aim was to encourage social inclusion and participation
through photography, and to keep traditional and experimental photography processes
alive. Ingrid is a director of Fotosynthesis and continues to undertake photographic
assignments around the world.
Valentina Schivardi grew up in Italy and studied photography at the C.F.P. Bauer of
Milan. After her graduation she moved to New York to develop and expand her
photographic portfolio and worked as a teaching assistant at the International Center of
Photography. In 2006 she moved to London and undertook an MA in Photojournalism
and Documentary Photography at LCC, University of the Arts London. In 2010 she joined
Fotosynthesis, as a director where she is developing her interest in documentary
photography and participatory methods.
David Kendall's photography and research explore how spatial, economic and design
initiatives, as well as participatory practices, combine to encourage social and spatial
interconnections or conflict in cities. He is a graduate of LCC, University of the Arts
London, and Goldsmiths, University of London, where he studied photography and urban
sociology. His photographs, spatial research and collaborative projects have featured in
exhibitions, festivals, conferences and symposia at museums and academic institutions
worldwide. David designs advocacy projects, conducts qualitative research, spatial
engagement and consultation strategies and implements media campaigns. He facilitates
workshops with NGOs, charities, architects, media and educational organisations
including Goldsmiths, University of London, UAL, Age UK, Groundswell, Lifeline and
Tower Hamlets Drug Action Team. David is a director of Fotosynthesis and is a visiting
research fellow at Goldsmiths, University of London.
Adam Hopkins is the producer and director of the documentary ‘Wild Things’. ‘In the
early 1970s a group of idealistic young adults converted a regular north London house
into a revolutionary commune. Their children would not belong to anybody – they would
be free. As part of this new way of life, the children were not given their father’s
surname, they were all given a new name, ‘Wild’ (Raw TV). This film was shown on
Channel 4 in 2009. Noni Stacey would like to thank Adam Hopkins and Lucy Willis at
Raw TV for giving LCC permission to show this film.
Moose on the Loose, the first Biennale of Research, organised by the UAL Photography
and the Archive Research Centre (PARC) explores and celebrates photography research
in and around the University of the Arts London. It includes exhibitions, conversations,
study days, films, research meetings, preview parties and launches. The Biennale will be
held at the London College of Communication (LCC) and at venues across London in May
2013. Among the Biennale’s themes are research into war and conflict, women’s
photography in the 1990s, the history and legacy of community and photography in the
1970s, photography and queerness and photography and the contemporary imaginary.
Beginning with the opening of the exhibitions Closer and A Model War, the Biennale
explores the process and the manifestation of the ever-changing and developing research
landscape. www.mooseontheloose.net
Moose was directed by Val Williams, creatively produced by Wendy Short and organised
by Monica Takvam and Brigitte Lardinois

 

Rolling Sisters by Lenthall Road Workshop (image courtesy Jess Baines)
Our Body by See Red Women's Workshop (image courtesy Jess Baines)

Download PDF