2011 The Architecture of Conflict

2012: The Architecture of Conflict

Programme for Study Day on the Architecture of Conflict Dec 5th 2012

10.00- 11.30 Participants to visit the Theatre of War Exhibition at the Imperial War Museum (unguided tour at own pace)

Main Lecture Theatre, London College of Communication

12.00: Brigitte Lardinois of The Photography and the Archive Research Center at UAL will introduce the study day.

1210- 13.00 Hilary Roberts, Head Curator, Photograph Archive at the IWM will talk about curating the Theatre of War exhibition

13.00-14.00 hours lunch break (lunch not provided)

14.00-15.00 Professor Paul Seawright will talk about his work engaging with the issues around the photographic representation of conflict.

15.00-15.25 Paul Lowe will talk about the Forensic Turn and The Thingness of Photographs in conflict imagery

15.30- 15.50 Dr Jennifer Pollard will talk about her research on the visual representation of the aftermath of 9/11

10 minute break

16.00- 17.00 plenary discussion

17.00- 18.00 drinks

For further information about the Exhibition please see the link below

http://www.iwm.org.uk/exhibitions/iwm-london/cecil-beaton-theatre-of-war?gclid=CMPmjNebnLMCFUfJtAoddXgAUw

Cecil Beaton: Theatre of War

6 September 2012 – 1 January 2013

Cecil Beaton is one of Britain’s most celebrated photographers and designers. His glamorous photographs of royalty and celebrities projected him to fame but his extraordinary work as a wartime photographer is less well-known.

Commissioned by the Ministry of Information in July 1940, Beaton was the longest serving high-profile photographer to cover the Second World War. He travelled throughout Britain, the Middle East, India, China and Burma and captured a world on the brink of lasting change.

In later years, Beaton attributed his war photographs as his single most important body of photographic work. Through his photographs, drawings and books as well as his work in theatre and film, this exhibition tells the story of how the war became a personal turning point in Beaton’s career.

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PHOTOGRAPHY
AND THE ARCHIVE
RESEARCH CENTRE

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2011 The Architecture of Conflict

2012: The Architecture of Conflict

Programme for Study Day on the Architecture of Conflict Dec 5th 2012

10.00- 11.30 Participants to visit the Theatre of War Exhibition at the Imperial War Museum (unguided tour at own pace)

Main Lecture Theatre, London College of Communication

12.00: Brigitte Lardinois of The Photography and the Archive Research Center at UAL will introduce the study day.

1210- 13.00 Hilary Roberts, Head Curator, Photograph Archive at the IWM will talk about curating the Theatre of War exhibition

13.00-14.00 hours lunch break (lunch not provided)

14.00-15.00 Professor Paul Seawright will talk about his work engaging with the issues around the photographic representation of conflict.

15.00-15.25 Paul Lowe will talk about the Forensic Turn and The Thingness of Photographs in conflict imagery

15.30- 15.50 Dr Jennifer Pollard will talk about her research on the visual representation of the aftermath of 9/11

10 minute break

16.00- 17.00 plenary discussion

17.00- 18.00 drinks

For further information about the Exhibition please see the link below

http://www.iwm.org.uk/exhibitions/iwm-london/cecil-beaton-theatre-of-war?gclid=CMPmjNebnLMCFUfJtAoddXgAUw

Cecil Beaton: Theatre of War

6 September 2012 – 1 January 2013

Cecil Beaton is one of Britain’s most celebrated photographers and designers. His glamorous photographs of royalty and celebrities projected him to fame but his extraordinary work as a wartime photographer is less well-known.

Commissioned by the Ministry of Information in July 1940, Beaton was the longest serving high-profile photographer to cover the Second World War. He travelled throughout Britain, the Middle East, India, China and Burma and captured a world on the brink of lasting change.

In later years, Beaton attributed his war photographs as his single most important body of photographic work. Through his photographs, drawings and books as well as his work in theatre and film, this exhibition tells the story of how the war became a personal turning point in Beaton’s career.