Stories Seen Through a Glass Plate

Stories Seen Through a Glass Plate

May 6th 2015, 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

London College of Communication, Upper Street Gallery, London, SE1 6SB

Brigitte Lardinois will discuss the process and making of the site –specific installation which she co-curated with Matt Haycocks in the summer of 2014, as part of the Brighton Photography Biennale, based around the archive of the historic Edward Reeves Studio in Lewes.

Edward Reeves took up photography in 1855 and established a studio in 1858 in the High Street in Lewes. Today his great-grandson Tom takes photographs in the same studio. The Edward Reeves Studio is thought to be the oldest continuously operated photographic studio in the world. Its archive of over 100,000 glass plates with related paperwork is both a unique and living record of the daily life of this market town and the history of photographic practice. There are approximately another 200,000 photographs on film and shot digitally.

The archive is of international significance, and important in the history of commercial photography and, in addition to the photographs contains ledgers and account books going back to the beginnings of the studio.

Find out more at: www.reevesarchive.co.uk

PHOTOGRAPHY
AND THE ARCHIVE
RESEARCH CENTRE

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Stories Seen Through a Glass Plate

Stories Seen Through a Glass Plate

May 6th 2015, 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

London College of Communication, Upper Street Gallery, London, SE1 6SB

Brigitte Lardinois will discuss the process and making of the site –specific installation which she co-curated with Matt Haycocks in the summer of 2014, as part of the Brighton Photography Biennale, based around the archive of the historic Edward Reeves Studio in Lewes.

Edward Reeves took up photography in 1855 and established a studio in 1858 in the High Street in Lewes. Today his great-grandson Tom takes photographs in the same studio. The Edward Reeves Studio is thought to be the oldest continuously operated photographic studio in the world. Its archive of over 100,000 glass plates with related paperwork is both a unique and living record of the daily life of this market town and the history of photographic practice. There are approximately another 200,000 photographs on film and shot digitally.

The archive is of international significance, and important in the history of commercial photography and, in addition to the photographs contains ledgers and account books going back to the beginnings of the studio.

Find out more at: www.reevesarchive.co.uk