Moose on the Loose Contributors 2015

Ajamu (In Conversation with Ope Lori) attended the Jan Van Eyck Academy, Maastricht, Netherlands and lives and works in London. He is an acclaimed artist working with predominately black male portraits, self-portraits and studio -based constructed imagery. His work has been shown in many galleries, museums and alternative spaces around the world including: Neuberger Museum (NYC) Tropen Museum (Amsterdam) Neus Gallery (Austria) Schirn Kunstalle (Germany), Foto Institute (Rotterdam), Pinacoteca Do Estado (Sao Paulo) and Guildhall Art Gallery (London). Work has been published in a wide variety of publications, critical art journals and campaign materials, and resides in many private and public collections, worldwide. He has participated in and delivered many photo-related workshops, lectures and symposiums. www.ajamu-fineartphotography.co.uk

Ahmed Ateyya (To be destroyed) is a Cairo-based award-winning journalist and documentary filmmaker. He has worked for several major Egyptian newspapers and online portals. His work has helped in introducing new concepts in interactive and online journalism in Egypt. He has worked as producer, field-producer, scriptwriter, and interviewer for multiple short and feature length documentaries, screened by the BBC, Al Jazeera, PBS. Ahmed holds a Master’s degree in screen documentary from Goldsmiths, University of London.

Rob Ball (Rumination on Time and Space) is an artist and Deputy Director of SEAS Photography, Director of Obsolete Studios / The Old Lookout and Senior Lecturer in Photography at Canterbury Christ Church University, UK. He gained his MA in Photography at the University of the Arts, London in 2006. Recent exhibitions include Dreamland at The Photographers’ Gallery, 2015; Obsolete Studios, Format Festival, Derby 2015 and 2013; Unremarkable Stories (publication), On Landscape #1, Guest Projects, London 2014; Exchange, Illinois State University 2013; Obsolete Studios, Turner Contemporary 2013; The Collected, Sidney Cooper Gallery, Canterbury 2013. www.robball.co.uk

Nicholas Barker (In Conversation with Martin Parr) trained as an anthropologist before becoming a filmmaker, directing documentaries, features, shorts and TV commercials. His most recent film Tokyo Dreams has had close to a million hits on Vimeo. Whilst at the BBC, he made Signs of the Times (the hilarious and harrowing chronicle of family relationships posing as a study of home decorating), and From A to B (the infamous study of people and their cars). The two mini-series rapidly gained cult status and heralded a new genre in British documentary making, perfectly demonstrating his idiosyncratic visual style and caustic sense of humour. www.nicholasbarker.com

Louise Beer (Aether) was born in 1986 in New Zealand and lives and works in London. She gained her BA in Fine Art, at Middlesex University in 2011 and her MA Art and Science, at Central Saint Martins in 2013. In 2014, Louise exhibited at the Moscow International Biennale of Young Art. She is co-director for the interdisciplinary arts and science agency super-collider and co-founder of the Lumen collective, which explores the relationship between astronomy and light. Louise constructs light installations in dark spaces, which she documents with long exposure photographs, and is now developing a series of ‘peephole’ light boxes. Louise’s practice is inspired by ‘a personal inquiry into the relationship between the self, and the profound Otherness of the Universe’. www.louisebeer.com

Jeremy Bowen (Behind the Frontlines) is a Welsh journalist and television presenter. He was the BBC’s Middle East correspondent based in Jerusalem between 1995 and 2000, and has been its Middle East Editor since 2005.

Will Brady (Moose designer) is a freelance graphic designer based in London, working primarily for clients in the arts. He specialises in identity development, print design and production, and is particularly interested in projects associated with typography, photography, books and literature. www.willbrady.net

David Campany (Moose 2015 Lecture) is a writer, curator and artist. Publications include: Walker Evans: the magazine work(2014); The Open Road: photographic road trips in America (2014); Gasoline (2013); Jeff Wall: Picture for Women (2010),Photography and Cinema (2008) and Art and Photography (2003). Forthcoming is A Handful of Dust, accompanied by an exhibition of the same name at Le Bal, Paris, in September 2015. He teaches at the University of Westminster.www.davidcampany.com

Robin Christian (Moose team, Anna Fox: the Workstations Files, John Wall) is an exhibition and events programmer, archivist and researcher currently working at the Photography and the Archive Research Centre at LCC as Projects Manager. Recent exhibition projects have included Life on the Road (LCC, 2014), Ken. To be destroyed (PARC, 2014), Not to be sold separately: The Observer Colour Magazine 1964-1995 (Kings Place, 2011) and The Lost Art of the Picture Library (Guardian News & Media Gallery, 2009). Robin’s research practise includes studies on news agency archives, Camerawor, the photographer Jane Bown and the emergence of British colour supplements. www.photographyresearchcentre.co.uk/who-we-are/staff/robin-christian

Alastair Cook (Filmpoem) is an award-winning artist, working as a photographer concentrating on antique technologies, and as a filmmaker combining video and hand-developed film-stock. Alastair is founding director of Filmpoem, an international film festival and workshop project. He is also the founder of the collaborative project Documenting Britain, driven by his desire to document the archipelago that is the British Isles. He is artist in residence for Kaunas Photography Gallery in Lithuania, representing Street Level Photoworks in Glasgow. www.alastaircook.com

Alexander Cooper (Six Arctic Animals) has run the letterpress workshop at LCC for the past eleven years and lectures on BA (Hons) Graphic & Media Design. His research focuses on the interaction between content and process, through pushing the boundaries of letterpress whilst respecting its traditions. Current projects include 6×6: Collaborative Letterpress Project, a collaboration between staff and students from six colleges with active letterpress workshops, exploring their geographic and contextual relationship to the letterpress process. www.6x6letterpress.co.uk

The Design Activism Research Hub aims to investigate the graphic design codes and visual communication conventions that communicate ideological positions and support social and political activism. While situating activist visual communication within a social, cultural and historical framework, the group also seeks to identify and reveal contemporary practices related to the use of new technologies and modes of communication as well as more traditional forms of protest and street graphics, banners, posters, pamphlets and flyers. The group is based within the School of Design at London College of Communication (LCC) and is open to all UAL staff and students with an interest in the field. Current members are Tony Credland, Jess Baines, Sian Cook, Leila Kassir, Tzortzis Rallis, Russell Bestley, Adriana Eysler and Charlotte Procter.

Dr Sara Davidmann (To Be Destroyed; Hags Unlimited Study Day) is a Senior Research Fellow at the London College of Communication and a member of PARC. Sara set up and convenes the UAL Gender and Sexuality Research Forum. Since 1999 she has taken photographs in collaboration with people from UK queer and transgender communities. Since 2009 Sara’s work on ‘The Family’ has included her own family and family history. Sara’s photographs are internationally exhibited and published, and she has received numerous awards for her work including from the Arts and Humanities Research Council, Wellcome Trust and Fulbright Hays Commission. Her most recent project Ken. To be destroyed was exhibited at Unity Theatre Liverpool as part of Homotopia’s 10th Anniversary Arts Festival 2013, ParcSpace 2014, Liverpool Museum 2014, LimeWharf Gallery 2014, and shown as an installation at the Victoria & Albert Museum for LGBTQ History Month 2015. Ken. To be destroyed will be published by Schilt in 2016. www.saradavidmann.com

Rebecca Davies (The People’s Bureau) is an artist working within a participatory practice through illustration, performance and event. In 2010 Rebecca graduated with an MA in Communication Art and Design from the Royal College of Art. In 2012-14 her project Beau Belles Ice Cream Van toured across the UK, where she worked with The V&A Museum of Childhood, Create London, the Barbican, the Museum of Club Culture, Hull and The Hen Lane Social Club, Coventry. Beau Belles was funded by Arts Council England and supported by Artsadmin. She has co-directed Studio at the Elephant, a unit in the Elephant and Castle Shopping Centre acting as a studio for artists to work with the local community and collaborating with organisations such as the Latin American Workers Association, LCC, Whitechapel Gallery and Tate Modern. Rebecca runs the community sessions at Whitechapel Gallery and is currently facilitating a project from Hackney Farm, mapping the E2 area in celebration of the farm’s 30th Anniversary. In 2010 Rebecca graduated with an MA in Communication Art and Design from Royal College of Art. Her illustrations of the Elephant and Castle got the Sheila Robinson Prize for Drawing and she was short listed for the Helen Hamlyn Design Award. www.theicecreamvan.tumblr.com / www.thepeoplesbureau.tumblr.com /cargocollective.com/rebeccadavies

Anna Fox (The Work Stations Files, Masterclass, Firecrackers) is Professor of Photography at the University for the Creative Arts, Farnham. She has produced numerous bodies of work, which have been exhibited and published internationally including at Tate Britain, the V&A and the National Media Museum. Series have included Work Stations, Friendly Fire,Cockroach Diary and My Mother’s Cupboards and My Father’s Words. Recent publications include Resort 1 and Resort 2.www.annafox.co.uk

Tara Hanrahan (Museum of Reinvention) is Special Projects Lead/Associate Lecturer, School of Design, London College of Communication. Tara’s practice-based research focuses on ways to integrate sustainable thinking into design education. Exploring how a well-informed and holistic understanding (which considers form, function, value and sustainability in equal measure) can be built into the culture of creative problem solving. Her research interests include communication design, sustainability, behaviour change, social design, disruptive innovation, design fiction, design activism, materials, reductive processes, resource efficiency, the circular economy, environmental design. She is co founder of the Conscientious Communicators Research Hub with Sarah Temple and co organizer of LCC Green Week. www.thinkdostudio.com

Matt Haycocks (Stories Seen Through a Glass Plate) builds interventions in public spaces using technology to display historic images in-situ (at the location of capture). His research project ’Where were we now’ explores the interpretation of photographs of place, and in particular the way heritage institutions use images from personal collections to give an account of the past. He teaches at the Belfast School of Architecture and Central Saint Martins, London.

Marcus Dickey Horley (In Conversation with Sarah Davidman) is the Curator of Access Projects, working within the Public Programmes team at both Tate Modern and Tate Britain. His role is to create events and activities to engage diverse and disabled visitors with Tate’s collection displays and exhibitions. Marcus is also the co-chair of Tate’s LGBT Staff Network, a group of people who work at Tate across many of its departments, which has the opportunity to influence Tate’s culture of diversity and inclusivity. Recently, Marcus has delivered a series of talks which explore evidence of LGBT life and culture in the Tate collection, and he has curated a series of tours, Queer Britannia, in which LGBT speakers, artists, historians and curators have been given a platform within Tate’s galleries to explore and draw out LGBT themes from our collection and exhibitions.

Max Houghton (Firecrackers) is Senior Lecturer in photography at London College of Communication. She edited the photography biannual, 8 magazine, for six years and now writes regularly about photographs for the international press including FOAM, Black & White Magazine and New Humanist. She is also published by The Telegraph, The Guardian and the BBC. Max is editorial consultant to The Little Black Gallery and Here Press, and an arts selector for Axis-Web. She has conducted public talks and lectures on photography at Sotheby’s Institute, The Frontline Club, LSE and the Royal Institution and curated exhibitions in London, Brighton and New York.

Tom Hunter (Library Books) is UAL Professor of Photography Research, teaches at the London College of Communication and is a member of PARC, exhibiting in and co curating PARC’s 2014 exhibition Life on the Road. He is an award winning and internationally acclaimed artist. His work has been exhibited nationally and internationally in major solo and group shows. He was awarded an Honorary Fellowship of the Royal Photographic Society in 2010. Tom graduated from the London College of Printing (now LCC) in 1994 and gained his MA at the Royal College of Art. In 1996, he was awarded the Photography Prize by Fuji Film for his series Travellers. In 1998 ‘Woman Reading a Possession Order’ from his series Persons Unknown, won the John Kobal Photographic Portrait Award at the National Portrait Gallery. In 2006, Tom became the only artist to have a solo photography show at the National Gallery for his series Living in Hell and Other Stories. His works are in many collections around the world including; MOMA, New York, The V&A, London, Moderna Museet, Stockholm, Smithsonian, Washington and the Los Angles County Museum of Art. Tom lives in East London and his work is often particular, but not exclusive, to his community and neighbourhood. www.tomhunter.org

Melanie King (MOOSE team, Shadows, Aether, Capturing Light) is the Research Administrator for the Photography and the Archive Research Centre (PARC) and founder of the London Alternative Photography Collective at Doomed Gallery, Dalston. Melanie is a working artist, and has recently completed residencies at The Story of Light Festival (Goa, India) and Four Corners (Bethnal Green). These residencies have contributed to Melanie’s ongoing First Light, a research project which focuses on the parallel histories of photography and astronomy since the 19th Century. Melanie is working with the UCL Space History Archive, The Royal Astronomical Society and The Royal Observatory to find out more about the intertwining narratives of polymath inventors, who may have contributed to both photographic and astronomical developments within this period. Melanie is a recent graduate of the Masters Degree in Art and Science at Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London. www.melaniek.co.uk

Brigitte Lardinois (MOOSE team, Capturing Light, Firecrackers, Stories Seen Through a Glass Plate) is Deputy Director of the Photography and the Archive Research Centre at the University of the Arts London and an LCC Senior Research Fellow. Before joining UAL she was the Cultural Director at Magnum Photos in London. She is the editor of Magnum Magnum, the sixtieth Anniversary book of the agency, published by Thames and Hudson. For Thames and Hudson she also edited Eve Arnold’s People and, with Val Williams, Magnum Ireland and she curated Arnold’s memorial exhibition All About Eve in 2012. In November 2012, she co-curated the A Day in the World exhibition with Val Williams which opened in Stockholm and Goteborg and toured internationally. She is currently researching the Edward Reeves archive in Lewes, East Sussex, established in 1855.www.photographyresearchcentre.co.uk/who-we-are/…/brigitte-lardinois

Dr Wiebke Leister (The Theatre of Photography Study Day) is a German artist and writer living in London. She studied photography at the University in Essen and has a PhD from the Royal College of Art in London. She is course leader for MA Photography at London College of Communication and has exhibited and published her work internationally, receiving several awards. She is a co-organizer of the Photography and the Contemporary Imaginary Research Hub and a member of the Photography and the Archive Research Centre (PARC) at University of the Arts London.www.photographyresearchcentre.co.uk/who-we-are/…/dr-wiebke-leister

Alan Little (Fieldstudy 21) is and award winning journalist who joined BBC Scotland in 1983 as a news and current affairs researcher. He transferred to London in 1985 to train as a radio reporter. He then spent two years with BBC Radio Solent, before moving to the BBC Radio 4’s Today programme in 1988 where he specialised in foreign reporting, including the Revolutions of 1989 in Eastern Europe. From 1990 to 1995 Little worked as a reporter for BBC News, reporting from Baghdad for the 1991 Gulf war and from Kuwait in the period following the war, covering the Shia rebellions. From 1991 to 1995, he reported the break-up of Yugoslavia. He co-wrote (with Laura Silber) the acclaimed book The Death of Yugoslavia, which accompanied the celebrated television series of the same name, produced by Norma Percy at Brook Lapping. In 1995, Alan moved to Johannesburg to begin a two-year stint as South Africa correspondent, during which time he reported on the aftermath of the genocide in Rwanda and the overthrow of President Mobutu in Zaire. In early 1999, he began work on current affairs projects and to present BBC Radio 4’s Today programme. Between 1997 and 1999 Alan was the BBC’s Moscow correspondent, reporting extensively on the political and economic upheaval of the Boris Yeltsin regime, as well as on major events such as the devastating earthquakes in Afghanistan in 1995. He worked as the BBC’s Africa correspondent from 2000 to 2001 and was then sent to be the BBC’s correspondent in Paris. He left the BBC at the end of 2014.

Dr Paul Lowe (Ožiljak (Scar) is the Course Director of the MA in Photojournalism and Documentary Photography at London College of Communication, and is a member of PARC. His work has been published in Time, Newsweek, Life, The Sunday Times Magazine, The Observer and The Independent amongst others. He has covered breaking news the world over, including the fall of the Berlin Wall, Nelson Mandela’s release, famine in Africa, the conflict in the former Yugoslavia and the destruction of Grozny. His book, Bosnians, documenting 10 years of the war and post war situation in Bosnia, was published in April 2005 by Saqi books. His most recent book, The Siege of Sarajevo, was published by Galerija 11 07 95, in July 2014. www.arts.ac.uk › Research › Research Staff › Staff Research Profiles A-Z

Len Lye (1901-1980) was born in New Zealand. In 1926, he moved to London and joined the Seven and Five Society, whose members included Ben Nicolson and Henry Moore. His first animated film was Tusalava (1928) and he subsequently worked with the GPO Film Unit and the Shell Film Unit to make a series of films, which through experimentation with abstract forms, put him at the vanguard of the medium. Lye moved to New York in 1944.

Maggie Norden (PARC Shorts) is a Creative Media director at the London College of Fashion, facilitating a range of industry projects She is an established broadcaster and producer. Her work includes radio and tv / archive in films – recent Bowie at V and A commentator. Always loves the vision and sound aesthetic. Maggie started her career at Capital Radio in 1973, as a newsroom trainee. While working in broadcasting, she won the TIME LIFE Award for the Set Book Series on Capital Radio, for her role as a presenter on the entertainment program, Hullaballoo. Maggie has produced documentaries including ‘Posers’, a film documenting the New Romantics on the Kings Road, as well as films with photographer Martin Parr, pioneers of modern design Robin and Lucienne Day and the Missoni family. www.arts.ac.uk › Research › Research Staff › Staff Research Profiles A-Z

Dr Ope Lori (in conversation with Ajamu) is a conceptual and political artist who works primarily with the moving image and photography, around the politics of representation, race, gender and sexual identity and the female form in popular culture. Playfully re-writing these racialized scripts, looking and being seen, recognition and misrecognition take place, through the use of homoerotic images ‘of’ and ‘between’, black women and white women in visual dialogues and, new to her most recent work, the incorporation of the male form. Ope’s practice aims to draw the viewer in through the ways that looking dynamics are turned upside down, from positions of power, to powerlessness, from being passive spectators to consciously viewing participants. She is interested in the use of aesthetics in making visually pleasing screen images, but is also drawn to non-aesthetic spaces and strategies, that draws the viewer into the work by experiencing the image, through desire and pleasure. Her works are purposely thought provoking and challenging through her explicit use of stereotypes, which focus on taboo subjects such as inter racial mixing, gender role-playing and sexuality, all of which stem from the feminist mantra that ‘the personal is political’. Of Nigerian heritage, she lives and works in London. www.opelori.com

Martin Parr (Moose Film; In Conversation with Nicholas Barker) is a photographer, curator, editor and filmmaker. His many photographic projects have been at the vanguard of international photographic practice since the 1970s. He is also distinguished as a collector, curator and editor and is a longstanding member of Magnum Photos. www.martinparr.com

Dean Pavitt, Loup Design (Fieldstudy) is a graphic designer working predominately with visual arts organisations, galleries and universities. He collaborates with artists to produce small edition books and other printed matter. He lives and works in Devon. He has designed every issue of Fieldstudy since no 3. www.loupdesign.co.uk

Andreas Philippopoulos-Mihalopoulos (The People’s Bureau) is Professor of Law & Theory at the University of Westminster. His research interests are radically interdisciplinary and include space, bodies, radical ontologies, post-humanist studies, critical autopoiesis, literature, psychoanalysis, continental philosophy, gender studies, art theory, and their connection to the law, all areas in which he has published. Andreas is also a practicing artist, working on photography, text and performance under the name of picpoet. His recent art publication is called a fjord eating its way into my arm, published by AND publishers, London. His academic books include the monographs Absent Environments (2007), Niklas Luhmann: Law, Justice, Society(2009), and Spatial Justice: Body Lawscape Atmosphere (2014).

Fiona Rogers (Firecrackers) is the Global Business Development Manager of Magnum Photos International and the founder of Firecracker, a platform established in 2011, supporting European women working in photography through a variety of online features, networking opportunities and public events. Before joining Magnum Photos, Fiona was employed at a London gallery and studied BA Arts & Media at the University for the Creative Arts in Surrey. She holds a postgraduate certificate from the London College of Communication in Creative Enterprise Management. www.fire-cracker.org

Dr Pratap Rughani’s (Moose Cinema, Justine) practice embraces a range of documentary film and photographic approaches. Much of his early film work is in observational broadcast documentary modes, with twenty-five films for BBC 2 and Channel 4. Other films are independent commissions for the British Council or research-supported projects for gallery spaces such as Modern Art Oxford. Many explore the dynamics of inter-cultural communication, conceiving documentary as a crucible in which people of radically different perspectives, cultures and politics come into relation, for example with the Truth & Reconciliation Commission of the new South Africa. He filmed in the aftermath of many moments of tension or emergence from conflict including in South Africa, Rwanda, Northern Ireland, Aboriginal Australia and across the Islamic world. Pratap is interested in cultivating pluralised film spaces through which newer understandings in inter-cultural documentary can evolve. He writes on practical and philosophical questions of documentary film in a number of book chapters, academic and journalistic articles exploring questions of documentary ethics, peace and conflict and post-colonial emergence. Pratap is a Reader and Course Director of MA Documentary Film at the London College of Communication. lotusfilms.co.uk / www.arts.ac.uk › Research › Research Staff › Staff Research Profiles A-Z

Dr Nicky Ryan (After the Fire) is the Acting Course Leader for BA (Hons) Design Cultures and Programme Director Spatial Communication and Contextual & Theoretical Studies at LCC. Nicky is a Programme Director in the School of Design responsible for the academic leadership and management of the Spatial Communication and Contextual & Theoretical Studies Programme. Before her career in education, Nicky worked in fashion as a self-taught designer/maker followed by jobs in fashion retailing in the areas of buying, marketing, visual merchandising and merchandise management. Her undergraduate and postgraduate studies were in the History of Art and Architecture and her doctoral thesis examined the relationship between museums and the market. Nicky has delivered a range of book chapters, articles, refereed journals and conference proceedings on the above and is currently completing a book on contemporary patronage for Ashgate. Recent publications include ‘Art and urban renewal: Public and private developments in Las Vegas, The Marketing Review, (Dec 2013) pp. 283-295. Review of Serpentine Sackler Gallery, Museums Journal, (Dec 2013) pp.50-53. Patronage’ in Fashion and Art (Berg, 2012) pp. 155-167, and ‘Lobby Living’ in Performance, Fashion and the Modern Interior (Berg, 2011) pp.209-230.www.arts.ac.uk/lcc/people/school-of-design-teaching-staff/dr-nicky-ryan

Eva Sajovic (The People’s Bureau) is a Slovene born artist photographer, living and working in London. Her focus is on socially engaged, participatory practice, in particular working with marginalised communities or those affected by processes of change. Eva has been commissioned by Tate Modern, Whitechapel Art Gallery, The National Archives, Ffotogallery, Cuming museum, 198 Contemporary Arts and Learning and supported by the Paul Hamlyn Foundation, Joseph Rowntree Foundation and the Heritage Lottery Fund. She is an Associated Lecturer at UAL’s Central Saint Martins and Chelsea College of Art. Eva is currently working on the Hidden Presence project, (Ffotogallery and Chepstow Museum), engaging in issues of borderlands, identity and migration. She has worked with Roma communities for a number of years. Her most recent projectDreamMakers, in collaboration with 198 CAL, and supported by the Paul Hamlyn Foundation, was published in 2013. Be-Longing (with associated events programme) was shown at 198 gallery with support from the Arts Council England. As part of the Roma Media Archive she participated in the 2nd Roma Pavilion at the Venice Biennale in 2011. For several years Eva has been working on various projects in Elephant&Castle, undergoing massive regeneration: Home From Home, Studio at the Elephant and Collecting Home residency. www.evasajovic.co.uk / www.peoplesbureau.tumblr.com / www.homefromhome-online.com / www.therolesweplay.co.uk

Dr Karen Shepherdson (Rumination on Time and Space) is an artist and principal lecturer in photography at Canterbury Christ Church University, Director of both SEAS Photography (South East Archive of Seaside Photography) and Co-Director of the Old Lookout Gallery in Broadstairs, Kent. Much of her current creative practice is initiated by theoretical engagement which she then realises through the photographic and mixed-media. Karen produced the award-winning documentary film ‘A Life on Film ‘(2009) and also ‘Punctum’ (2010). Her photographic work has been exhibited in the UK, Scandinavia and the USA. Karen has also curated a number of exhibitions and published a number of articles and co-edited the four-volume Routledge collection on Film Theory. www.karenshepherdson.com

Dr Corinne Silva (Moose Team, Garden State, Underway, Filmpoem, Masterclass) is a Post-Doctoral Research Fellow at the London College of Communication and a member of PARC. Corinne’s practice explores the use of the still and moving image in suggesting metaphysical space. Her quiet, meditative visual language engages with the potentials and restrictions of lens-based media and the evolving relationship between politics, landscape and art histories. Her exhibition Garden State opened at Ffotogallery, Wales, in March 2015 and is showing as part of Moose at The Mosaic Rooms, London. www.corinnesilva.com

Noni Stacey (Hags Unlimited study day) is completing her PhD at the London College of Communication, University of the Arts London, where she is researching London- based radical photography collectives of the 1970s. Noni is attached to the Photography and the Archive Research Centre (PARC). She completed her MA in the history and theory of photography at Sotheby’s Institute of Art in 2010. Before returning to education, she worked as a freelance picture editor and researcher for publications such as Guardian Weekend Magazine, The Guardian and The Independent on Sunday. She has also worked as a TV news producer and journalist. www.photographyresearchcentre.co.uk/who-we-are/phd-students/current-noni-stacey

Monica Takvam (MOOSE Team, Moose Cinema co-ordinator) is a visual artist and photographer living and working in London. She was part of the Moose 2013 team and is also Assistant Editor of the Journal of Photography and Culture and co convenor of the Nostalgias conference in 2012. Her work has been shown in exhibitions throughout England and Norway. www.monicatakvam.com

Sarah Temple (Museum of Reinvention) is Course Leader for the Diploma in Professional Studies, an optional year long course of experiential learning, combined with internships, collaboration and design volunteering taught within the School of Design, with an elite community of Alumni. Sarah established ‘Conscientious Communicators’ at LCC in 2011, a community of staff, students and researchers who put ethical and sustainable considerations at the heart of their practice. This was intended to consolidate the LCC philosophy of ‘Practice for the Public Good’ first established at the LCP in the 1960s.She is the co- organizer of LCC Green Week. Sarah’s pedagogical interests lie in the relationship between education and professional practice. Her MA dissertation in Teaching & Learning focused on the subject of experiential learning and the value of ‘real’ experience during a degree. http://www.arts.ac.uk/lcc/people/school-of-design-teaching-staff/sarah-temple/

Val Williams (Moose Director, Ožiljak (Scar) John Wall) is a writer and curator, and Professor of the History and Culture of Photography at UAL and Director of the Photography and the Archive Research Centre (PARC) at the London College of Communication. She initiated Moose on the Loose in 2013, and she is a co -editor of the Journal of Photography and Culture. She has curated exhibitions at the V&A, the National Media Museum, the Barbican Art Gallery and Tate Britain. Val compiled the Moose programmes for 2013 and 2015, and is also the curator, for 2015, of Ožiljak (Scar). Her publications include Martin Parr, Daniel Meadows: Edited Photographs and Anna Fox: Photographic Works 1983-2007. www.photographyresearchcentre.co.uk/who-we…/professor-val-williams

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Moose on the Loose Contributors 2015

Ajamu (In Conversation with Ope Lori) attended the Jan Van Eyck Academy, Maastricht, Netherlands and lives and works in London. He is an acclaimed artist working with predominately black male portraits, self-portraits and studio -based constructed imagery. His work has been shown in many galleries, museums and alternative spaces around the world including: Neuberger Museum (NYC) Tropen Museum (Amsterdam) Neus Gallery (Austria) Schirn Kunstalle (Germany), Foto Institute (Rotterdam), Pinacoteca Do Estado (Sao Paulo) and Guildhall Art Gallery (London). Work has been published in a wide variety of publications, critical art journals and campaign materials, and resides in many private and public collections, worldwide. He has participated in and delivered many photo-related workshops, lectures and symposiums. www.ajamu-fineartphotography.co.uk

Ahmed Ateyya (To be destroyed) is a Cairo-based award-winning journalist and documentary filmmaker. He has worked for several major Egyptian newspapers and online portals. His work has helped in introducing new concepts in interactive and online journalism in Egypt. He has worked as producer, field-producer, scriptwriter, and interviewer for multiple short and feature length documentaries, screened by the BBC, Al Jazeera, PBS. Ahmed holds a Master’s degree in screen documentary from Goldsmiths, University of London.

Rob Ball (Rumination on Time and Space) is an artist and Deputy Director of SEAS Photography, Director of Obsolete Studios / The Old Lookout and Senior Lecturer in Photography at Canterbury Christ Church University, UK. He gained his MA in Photography at the University of the Arts, London in 2006. Recent exhibitions include Dreamland at The Photographers’ Gallery, 2015; Obsolete Studios, Format Festival, Derby 2015 and 2013; Unremarkable Stories (publication), On Landscape #1, Guest Projects, London 2014; Exchange, Illinois State University 2013; Obsolete Studios, Turner Contemporary 2013; The Collected, Sidney Cooper Gallery, Canterbury 2013. www.robball.co.uk

Nicholas Barker (In Conversation with Martin Parr) trained as an anthropologist before becoming a filmmaker, directing documentaries, features, shorts and TV commercials. His most recent film Tokyo Dreams has had close to a million hits on Vimeo. Whilst at the BBC, he made Signs of the Times (the hilarious and harrowing chronicle of family relationships posing as a study of home decorating), and From A to B (the infamous study of people and their cars). The two mini-series rapidly gained cult status and heralded a new genre in British documentary making, perfectly demonstrating his idiosyncratic visual style and caustic sense of humour. www.nicholasbarker.com

Louise Beer (Aether) was born in 1986 in New Zealand and lives and works in London. She gained her BA in Fine Art, at Middlesex University in 2011 and her MA Art and Science, at Central Saint Martins in 2013. In 2014, Louise exhibited at the Moscow International Biennale of Young Art. She is co-director for the interdisciplinary arts and science agency super-collider and co-founder of the Lumen collective, which explores the relationship between astronomy and light. Louise constructs light installations in dark spaces, which she documents with long exposure photographs, and is now developing a series of ‘peephole’ light boxes. Louise’s practice is inspired by ‘a personal inquiry into the relationship between the self, and the profound Otherness of the Universe’. www.louisebeer.com

Jeremy Bowen (Behind the Frontlines) is a Welsh journalist and television presenter. He was the BBC’s Middle East correspondent based in Jerusalem between 1995 and 2000, and has been its Middle East Editor since 2005.

Will Brady (Moose designer) is a freelance graphic designer based in London, working primarily for clients in the arts. He specialises in identity development, print design and production, and is particularly interested in projects associated with typography, photography, books and literature. www.willbrady.net

David Campany (Moose 2015 Lecture) is a writer, curator and artist. Publications include: Walker Evans: the magazine work(2014); The Open Road: photographic road trips in America (2014); Gasoline (2013); Jeff Wall: Picture for Women (2010),Photography and Cinema (2008) and Art and Photography (2003). Forthcoming is A Handful of Dust, accompanied by an exhibition of the same name at Le Bal, Paris, in September 2015. He teaches at the University of Westminster.www.davidcampany.com

Robin Christian (Moose team, Anna Fox: the Workstations Files, John Wall) is an exhibition and events programmer, archivist and researcher currently working at the Photography and the Archive Research Centre at LCC as Projects Manager. Recent exhibition projects have included Life on the Road (LCC, 2014), Ken. To be destroyed (PARC, 2014), Not to be sold separately: The Observer Colour Magazine 1964-1995 (Kings Place, 2011) and The Lost Art of the Picture Library (Guardian News & Media Gallery, 2009). Robin’s research practise includes studies on news agency archives, Camerawor, the photographer Jane Bown and the emergence of British colour supplements. www.photographyresearchcentre.co.uk/who-we-are/staff/robin-christian

Alastair Cook (Filmpoem) is an award-winning artist, working as a photographer concentrating on antique technologies, and as a filmmaker combining video and hand-developed film-stock. Alastair is founding director of Filmpoem, an international film festival and workshop project. He is also the founder of the collaborative project Documenting Britain, driven by his desire to document the archipelago that is the British Isles. He is artist in residence for Kaunas Photography Gallery in Lithuania, representing Street Level Photoworks in Glasgow. www.alastaircook.com

Alexander Cooper (Six Arctic Animals) has run the letterpress workshop at LCC for the past eleven years and lectures on BA (Hons) Graphic & Media Design. His research focuses on the interaction between content and process, through pushing the boundaries of letterpress whilst respecting its traditions. Current projects include 6×6: Collaborative Letterpress Project, a collaboration between staff and students from six colleges with active letterpress workshops, exploring their geographic and contextual relationship to the letterpress process. www.6x6letterpress.co.uk

The Design Activism Research Hub aims to investigate the graphic design codes and visual communication conventions that communicate ideological positions and support social and political activism. While situating activist visual communication within a social, cultural and historical framework, the group also seeks to identify and reveal contemporary practices related to the use of new technologies and modes of communication as well as more traditional forms of protest and street graphics, banners, posters, pamphlets and flyers. The group is based within the School of Design at London College of Communication (LCC) and is open to all UAL staff and students with an interest in the field. Current members are Tony Credland, Jess Baines, Sian Cook, Leila Kassir, Tzortzis Rallis, Russell Bestley, Adriana Eysler and Charlotte Procter.

Dr Sara Davidmann (To Be Destroyed; Hags Unlimited Study Day) is a Senior Research Fellow at the London College of Communication and a member of PARC. Sara set up and convenes the UAL Gender and Sexuality Research Forum. Since 1999 she has taken photographs in collaboration with people from UK queer and transgender communities. Since 2009 Sara’s work on ‘The Family’ has included her own family and family history. Sara’s photographs are internationally exhibited and published, and she has received numerous awards for her work including from the Arts and Humanities Research Council, Wellcome Trust and Fulbright Hays Commission. Her most recent project Ken. To be destroyed was exhibited at Unity Theatre Liverpool as part of Homotopia’s 10th Anniversary Arts Festival 2013, ParcSpace 2014, Liverpool Museum 2014, LimeWharf Gallery 2014, and shown as an installation at the Victoria & Albert Museum for LGBTQ History Month 2015. Ken. To be destroyed will be published by Schilt in 2016. www.saradavidmann.com

Rebecca Davies (The People’s Bureau) is an artist working within a participatory practice through illustration, performance and event. In 2010 Rebecca graduated with an MA in Communication Art and Design from the Royal College of Art. In 2012-14 her project Beau Belles Ice Cream Van toured across the UK, where she worked with The V&A Museum of Childhood, Create London, the Barbican, the Museum of Club Culture, Hull and The Hen Lane Social Club, Coventry. Beau Belles was funded by Arts Council England and supported by Artsadmin. She has co-directed Studio at the Elephant, a unit in the Elephant and Castle Shopping Centre acting as a studio for artists to work with the local community and collaborating with organisations such as the Latin American Workers Association, LCC, Whitechapel Gallery and Tate Modern. Rebecca runs the community sessions at Whitechapel Gallery and is currently facilitating a project from Hackney Farm, mapping the E2 area in celebration of the farm’s 30th Anniversary. In 2010 Rebecca graduated with an MA in Communication Art and Design from Royal College of Art. Her illustrations of the Elephant and Castle got the Sheila Robinson Prize for Drawing and she was short listed for the Helen Hamlyn Design Award. www.theicecreamvan.tumblr.com / www.thepeoplesbureau.tumblr.com /cargocollective.com/rebeccadavies

Anna Fox (The Work Stations Files, Masterclass, Firecrackers) is Professor of Photography at the University for the Creative Arts, Farnham. She has produced numerous bodies of work, which have been exhibited and published internationally including at Tate Britain, the V&A and the National Media Museum. Series have included Work Stations, Friendly Fire,Cockroach Diary and My Mother’s Cupboards and My Father’s Words. Recent publications include Resort 1 and Resort 2.www.annafox.co.uk

Tara Hanrahan (Museum of Reinvention) is Special Projects Lead/Associate Lecturer, School of Design, London College of Communication. Tara’s practice-based research focuses on ways to integrate sustainable thinking into design education. Exploring how a well-informed and holistic understanding (which considers form, function, value and sustainability in equal measure) can be built into the culture of creative problem solving. Her research interests include communication design, sustainability, behaviour change, social design, disruptive innovation, design fiction, design activism, materials, reductive processes, resource efficiency, the circular economy, environmental design. She is co founder of the Conscientious Communicators Research Hub with Sarah Temple and co organizer of LCC Green Week. www.thinkdostudio.com

Matt Haycocks (Stories Seen Through a Glass Plate) builds interventions in public spaces using technology to display historic images in-situ (at the location of capture). His research project ’Where were we now’ explores the interpretation of photographs of place, and in particular the way heritage institutions use images from personal collections to give an account of the past. He teaches at the Belfast School of Architecture and Central Saint Martins, London.

Marcus Dickey Horley (In Conversation with Sarah Davidman) is the Curator of Access Projects, working within the Public Programmes team at both Tate Modern and Tate Britain. His role is to create events and activities to engage diverse and disabled visitors with Tate’s collection displays and exhibitions. Marcus is also the co-chair of Tate’s LGBT Staff Network, a group of people who work at Tate across many of its departments, which has the opportunity to influence Tate’s culture of diversity and inclusivity. Recently, Marcus has delivered a series of talks which explore evidence of LGBT life and culture in the Tate collection, and he has curated a series of tours, Queer Britannia, in which LGBT speakers, artists, historians and curators have been given a platform within Tate’s galleries to explore and draw out LGBT themes from our collection and exhibitions.

Max Houghton (Firecrackers) is Senior Lecturer in photography at London College of Communication. She edited the photography biannual, 8 magazine, for six years and now writes regularly about photographs for the international press including FOAM, Black & White Magazine and New Humanist. She is also published by The Telegraph, The Guardian and the BBC. Max is editorial consultant to The Little Black Gallery and Here Press, and an arts selector for Axis-Web. She has conducted public talks and lectures on photography at Sotheby’s Institute, The Frontline Club, LSE and the Royal Institution and curated exhibitions in London, Brighton and New York.

Tom Hunter (Library Books) is UAL Professor of Photography Research, teaches at the London College of Communication and is a member of PARC, exhibiting in and co curating PARC’s 2014 exhibition Life on the Road. He is an award winning and internationally acclaimed artist. His work has been exhibited nationally and internationally in major solo and group shows. He was awarded an Honorary Fellowship of the Royal Photographic Society in 2010. Tom graduated from the London College of Printing (now LCC) in 1994 and gained his MA at the Royal College of Art. In 1996, he was awarded the Photography Prize by Fuji Film for his series Travellers. In 1998 ‘Woman Reading a Possession Order’ from his series Persons Unknown, won the John Kobal Photographic Portrait Award at the National Portrait Gallery. In 2006, Tom became the only artist to have a solo photography show at the National Gallery for his series Living in Hell and Other Stories. His works are in many collections around the world including; MOMA, New York, The V&A, London, Moderna Museet, Stockholm, Smithsonian, Washington and the Los Angles County Museum of Art. Tom lives in East London and his work is often particular, but not exclusive, to his community and neighbourhood. www.tomhunter.org

Melanie King (MOOSE team, Shadows, Aether, Capturing Light) is the Research Administrator for the Photography and the Archive Research Centre (PARC) and founder of the London Alternative Photography Collective at Doomed Gallery, Dalston. Melanie is a working artist, and has recently completed residencies at The Story of Light Festival (Goa, India) and Four Corners (Bethnal Green). These residencies have contributed to Melanie’s ongoing First Light, a research project which focuses on the parallel histories of photography and astronomy since the 19th Century. Melanie is working with the UCL Space History Archive, The Royal Astronomical Society and The Royal Observatory to find out more about the intertwining narratives of polymath inventors, who may have contributed to both photographic and astronomical developments within this period. Melanie is a recent graduate of the Masters Degree in Art and Science at Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London. www.melaniek.co.uk

Brigitte Lardinois (MOOSE team, Capturing Light, Firecrackers, Stories Seen Through a Glass Plate) is Deputy Director of the Photography and the Archive Research Centre at the University of the Arts London and an LCC Senior Research Fellow. Before joining UAL she was the Cultural Director at Magnum Photos in London. She is the editor of Magnum Magnum, the sixtieth Anniversary book of the agency, published by Thames and Hudson. For Thames and Hudson she also edited Eve Arnold’s People and, with Val Williams, Magnum Ireland and she curated Arnold’s memorial exhibition All About Eve in 2012. In November 2012, she co-curated the A Day in the World exhibition with Val Williams which opened in Stockholm and Goteborg and toured internationally. She is currently researching the Edward Reeves archive in Lewes, East Sussex, established in 1855.www.photographyresearchcentre.co.uk/who-we-are/…/brigitte-lardinois

Dr Wiebke Leister (The Theatre of Photography Study Day) is a German artist and writer living in London. She studied photography at the University in Essen and has a PhD from the Royal College of Art in London. She is course leader for MA Photography at London College of Communication and has exhibited and published her work internationally, receiving several awards. She is a co-organizer of the Photography and the Contemporary Imaginary Research Hub and a member of the Photography and the Archive Research Centre (PARC) at University of the Arts London.www.photographyresearchcentre.co.uk/who-we-are/…/dr-wiebke-leister

Alan Little (Fieldstudy 21) is and award winning journalist who joined BBC Scotland in 1983 as a news and current affairs researcher. He transferred to London in 1985 to train as a radio reporter. He then spent two years with BBC Radio Solent, before moving to the BBC Radio 4’s Today programme in 1988 where he specialised in foreign reporting, including the Revolutions of 1989 in Eastern Europe. From 1990 to 1995 Little worked as a reporter for BBC News, reporting from Baghdad for the 1991 Gulf war and from Kuwait in the period following the war, covering the Shia rebellions. From 1991 to 1995, he reported the break-up of Yugoslavia. He co-wrote (with Laura Silber) the acclaimed book The Death of Yugoslavia, which accompanied the celebrated television series of the same name, produced by Norma Percy at Brook Lapping. In 1995, Alan moved to Johannesburg to begin a two-year stint as South Africa correspondent, during which time he reported on the aftermath of the genocide in Rwanda and the overthrow of President Mobutu in Zaire. In early 1999, he began work on current affairs projects and to present BBC Radio 4’s Today programme. Between 1997 and 1999 Alan was the BBC’s Moscow correspondent, reporting extensively on the political and economic upheaval of the Boris Yeltsin regime, as well as on major events such as the devastating earthquakes in Afghanistan in 1995. He worked as the BBC’s Africa correspondent from 2000 to 2001 and was then sent to be the BBC’s correspondent in Paris. He left the BBC at the end of 2014.

Dr Paul Lowe (Ožiljak (Scar) is the Course Director of the MA in Photojournalism and Documentary Photography at London College of Communication, and is a member of PARC. His work has been published in Time, Newsweek, Life, The Sunday Times Magazine, The Observer and The Independent amongst others. He has covered breaking news the world over, including the fall of the Berlin Wall, Nelson Mandela’s release, famine in Africa, the conflict in the former Yugoslavia and the destruction of Grozny. His book, Bosnians, documenting 10 years of the war and post war situation in Bosnia, was published in April 2005 by Saqi books. His most recent book, The Siege of Sarajevo, was published by Galerija 11 07 95, in July 2014. www.arts.ac.uk › Research › Research Staff › Staff Research Profiles A-Z

Len Lye (1901-1980) was born in New Zealand. In 1926, he moved to London and joined the Seven and Five Society, whose members included Ben Nicolson and Henry Moore. His first animated film was Tusalava (1928) and he subsequently worked with the GPO Film Unit and the Shell Film Unit to make a series of films, which through experimentation with abstract forms, put him at the vanguard of the medium. Lye moved to New York in 1944.

Maggie Norden (PARC Shorts) is a Creative Media director at the London College of Fashion, facilitating a range of industry projects She is an established broadcaster and producer. Her work includes radio and tv / archive in films – recent Bowie at V and A commentator. Always loves the vision and sound aesthetic. Maggie started her career at Capital Radio in 1973, as a newsroom trainee. While working in broadcasting, she won the TIME LIFE Award for the Set Book Series on Capital Radio, for her role as a presenter on the entertainment program, Hullaballoo. Maggie has produced documentaries including ‘Posers’, a film documenting the New Romantics on the Kings Road, as well as films with photographer Martin Parr, pioneers of modern design Robin and Lucienne Day and the Missoni family. www.arts.ac.uk › Research › Research Staff › Staff Research Profiles A-Z

Dr Ope Lori (in conversation with Ajamu) is a conceptual and political artist who works primarily with the moving image and photography, around the politics of representation, race, gender and sexual identity and the female form in popular culture. Playfully re-writing these racialized scripts, looking and being seen, recognition and misrecognition take place, through the use of homoerotic images ‘of’ and ‘between’, black women and white women in visual dialogues and, new to her most recent work, the incorporation of the male form. Ope’s practice aims to draw the viewer in through the ways that looking dynamics are turned upside down, from positions of power, to powerlessness, from being passive spectators to consciously viewing participants. She is interested in the use of aesthetics in making visually pleasing screen images, but is also drawn to non-aesthetic spaces and strategies, that draws the viewer into the work by experiencing the image, through desire and pleasure. Her works are purposely thought provoking and challenging through her explicit use of stereotypes, which focus on taboo subjects such as inter racial mixing, gender role-playing and sexuality, all of which stem from the feminist mantra that ‘the personal is political’. Of Nigerian heritage, she lives and works in London. www.opelori.com

Martin Parr (Moose Film; In Conversation with Nicholas Barker) is a photographer, curator, editor and filmmaker. His many photographic projects have been at the vanguard of international photographic practice since the 1970s. He is also distinguished as a collector, curator and editor and is a longstanding member of Magnum Photos. www.martinparr.com

Dean Pavitt, Loup Design (Fieldstudy) is a graphic designer working predominately with visual arts organisations, galleries and universities. He collaborates with artists to produce small edition books and other printed matter. He lives and works in Devon. He has designed every issue of Fieldstudy since no 3. www.loupdesign.co.uk

Andreas Philippopoulos-Mihalopoulos (The People’s Bureau) is Professor of Law & Theory at the University of Westminster. His research interests are radically interdisciplinary and include space, bodies, radical ontologies, post-humanist studies, critical autopoiesis, literature, psychoanalysis, continental philosophy, gender studies, art theory, and their connection to the law, all areas in which he has published. Andreas is also a practicing artist, working on photography, text and performance under the name of picpoet. His recent art publication is called a fjord eating its way into my arm, published by AND publishers, London. His academic books include the monographs Absent Environments (2007), Niklas Luhmann: Law, Justice, Society(2009), and Spatial Justice: Body Lawscape Atmosphere (2014).

Fiona Rogers (Firecrackers) is the Global Business Development Manager of Magnum Photos International and the founder of Firecracker, a platform established in 2011, supporting European women working in photography through a variety of online features, networking opportunities and public events. Before joining Magnum Photos, Fiona was employed at a London gallery and studied BA Arts & Media at the University for the Creative Arts in Surrey. She holds a postgraduate certificate from the London College of Communication in Creative Enterprise Management. www.fire-cracker.org

Dr Pratap Rughani’s (Moose Cinema, Justine) practice embraces a range of documentary film and photographic approaches. Much of his early film work is in observational broadcast documentary modes, with twenty-five films for BBC 2 and Channel 4. Other films are independent commissions for the British Council or research-supported projects for gallery spaces such as Modern Art Oxford. Many explore the dynamics of inter-cultural communication, conceiving documentary as a crucible in which people of radically different perspectives, cultures and politics come into relation, for example with the Truth & Reconciliation Commission of the new South Africa. He filmed in the aftermath of many moments of tension or emergence from conflict including in South Africa, Rwanda, Northern Ireland, Aboriginal Australia and across the Islamic world. Pratap is interested in cultivating pluralised film spaces through which newer understandings in inter-cultural documentary can evolve. He writes on practical and philosophical questions of documentary film in a number of book chapters, academic and journalistic articles exploring questions of documentary ethics, peace and conflict and post-colonial emergence. Pratap is a Reader and Course Director of MA Documentary Film at the London College of Communication. lotusfilms.co.uk / www.arts.ac.uk › Research › Research Staff › Staff Research Profiles A-Z

Dr Nicky Ryan (After the Fire) is the Acting Course Leader for BA (Hons) Design Cultures and Programme Director Spatial Communication and Contextual & Theoretical Studies at LCC. Nicky is a Programme Director in the School of Design responsible for the academic leadership and management of the Spatial Communication and Contextual & Theoretical Studies Programme. Before her career in education, Nicky worked in fashion as a self-taught designer/maker followed by jobs in fashion retailing in the areas of buying, marketing, visual merchandising and merchandise management. Her undergraduate and postgraduate studies were in the History of Art and Architecture and her doctoral thesis examined the relationship between museums and the market. Nicky has delivered a range of book chapters, articles, refereed journals and conference proceedings on the above and is currently completing a book on contemporary patronage for Ashgate. Recent publications include ‘Art and urban renewal: Public and private developments in Las Vegas, The Marketing Review, (Dec 2013) pp. 283-295. Review of Serpentine Sackler Gallery, Museums Journal, (Dec 2013) pp.50-53. Patronage’ in Fashion and Art (Berg, 2012) pp. 155-167, and ‘Lobby Living’ in Performance, Fashion and the Modern Interior (Berg, 2011) pp.209-230.www.arts.ac.uk/lcc/people/school-of-design-teaching-staff/dr-nicky-ryan

Eva Sajovic (The People’s Bureau) is a Slovene born artist photographer, living and working in London. Her focus is on socially engaged, participatory practice, in particular working with marginalised communities or those affected by processes of change. Eva has been commissioned by Tate Modern, Whitechapel Art Gallery, The National Archives, Ffotogallery, Cuming museum, 198 Contemporary Arts and Learning and supported by the Paul Hamlyn Foundation, Joseph Rowntree Foundation and the Heritage Lottery Fund. She is an Associated Lecturer at UAL’s Central Saint Martins and Chelsea College of Art. Eva is currently working on the Hidden Presence project, (Ffotogallery and Chepstow Museum), engaging in issues of borderlands, identity and migration. She has worked with Roma communities for a number of years. Her most recent projectDreamMakers, in collaboration with 198 CAL, and supported by the Paul Hamlyn Foundation, was published in 2013. Be-Longing (with associated events programme) was shown at 198 gallery with support from the Arts Council England. As part of the Roma Media Archive she participated in the 2nd Roma Pavilion at the Venice Biennale in 2011. For several years Eva has been working on various projects in Elephant&Castle, undergoing massive regeneration: Home From Home, Studio at the Elephant and Collecting Home residency. www.evasajovic.co.uk / www.peoplesbureau.tumblr.com / www.homefromhome-online.com / www.therolesweplay.co.uk

Dr Karen Shepherdson (Rumination on Time and Space) is an artist and principal lecturer in photography at Canterbury Christ Church University, Director of both SEAS Photography (South East Archive of Seaside Photography) and Co-Director of the Old Lookout Gallery in Broadstairs, Kent. Much of her current creative practice is initiated by theoretical engagement which she then realises through the photographic and mixed-media. Karen produced the award-winning documentary film ‘A Life on Film ‘(2009) and also ‘Punctum’ (2010). Her photographic work has been exhibited in the UK, Scandinavia and the USA. Karen has also curated a number of exhibitions and published a number of articles and co-edited the four-volume Routledge collection on Film Theory. www.karenshepherdson.com

Dr Corinne Silva (Moose Team, Garden State, Underway, Filmpoem, Masterclass) is a Post-Doctoral Research Fellow at the London College of Communication and a member of PARC. Corinne’s practice explores the use of the still and moving image in suggesting metaphysical space. Her quiet, meditative visual language engages with the potentials and restrictions of lens-based media and the evolving relationship between politics, landscape and art histories. Her exhibition Garden State opened at Ffotogallery, Wales, in March 2015 and is showing as part of Moose at The Mosaic Rooms, London. www.corinnesilva.com

Noni Stacey (Hags Unlimited study day) is completing her PhD at the London College of Communication, University of the Arts London, where she is researching London- based radical photography collectives of the 1970s. Noni is attached to the Photography and the Archive Research Centre (PARC). She completed her MA in the history and theory of photography at Sotheby’s Institute of Art in 2010. Before returning to education, she worked as a freelance picture editor and researcher for publications such as Guardian Weekend Magazine, The Guardian and The Independent on Sunday. She has also worked as a TV news producer and journalist. www.photographyresearchcentre.co.uk/who-we-are/phd-students/current-noni-stacey

Monica Takvam (MOOSE Team, Moose Cinema co-ordinator) is a visual artist and photographer living and working in London. She was part of the Moose 2013 team and is also Assistant Editor of the Journal of Photography and Culture and co convenor of the Nostalgias conference in 2012. Her work has been shown in exhibitions throughout England and Norway. www.monicatakvam.com

Sarah Temple (Museum of Reinvention) is Course Leader for the Diploma in Professional Studies, an optional year long course of experiential learning, combined with internships, collaboration and design volunteering taught within the School of Design, with an elite community of Alumni. Sarah established ‘Conscientious Communicators’ at LCC in 2011, a community of staff, students and researchers who put ethical and sustainable considerations at the heart of their practice. This was intended to consolidate the LCC philosophy of ‘Practice for the Public Good’ first established at the LCP in the 1960s.She is the co- organizer of LCC Green Week. Sarah’s pedagogical interests lie in the relationship between education and professional practice. Her MA dissertation in Teaching & Learning focused on the subject of experiential learning and the value of ‘real’ experience during a degree. http://www.arts.ac.uk/lcc/people/school-of-design-teaching-staff/sarah-temple/

Val Williams (Moose Director, Ožiljak (Scar) John Wall) is a writer and curator, and Professor of the History and Culture of Photography at UAL and Director of the Photography and the Archive Research Centre (PARC) at the London College of Communication. She initiated Moose on the Loose in 2013, and she is a co -editor of the Journal of Photography and Culture. She has curated exhibitions at the V&A, the National Media Museum, the Barbican Art Gallery and Tate Britain. Val compiled the Moose programmes for 2013 and 2015, and is also the curator, for 2015, of Ožiljak (Scar). Her publications include Martin Parr, Daniel Meadows: Edited Photographs and Anna Fox: Photographic Works 1983-2007. www.photographyresearchcentre.co.uk/who-we…/professor-val-williams