The Tourism of War Symposium

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The Tourism of War Symposium: Wednesday 26 November, 14:00 – 16:00.
Main Lecture Theatre, UAL London College of Communication

See Exhibition Page Here

The Tourism of War explores battlefields as spaces of memory and remembrance, becoming sites of pilgrimage for those who wish to remember or grieve. At the core of the exhibition are works from three photographers who have engaged with the ‘hollows of memory’ contained in the landscape: postcards made of the destruction of the Belgian town of Ypres during and after World War I by the Antony Brothers, and collected by Paul Lowe, the British WWI cemeteries documented by Daniel Alexander, and the D-day landing beaches photographed by Simon Norfolk. The project is curated by Paul Lowe.

Simon Norfolk is an internationally renowned landscape photographer whose work over the last ten years has been themed around a probing and stretching of the meaning of the word ‘battlefield’ in all its forms. He has photographed in some of the world’s worst war zones and refugee crises, but is ‘equally at home photographing supercomputers used to design military systems or test launches of nuclear systems.’

His work has been widely recognised: he has won Le Prix Dialogue at Les Rencontres d'Arles in 2005; The Infinity Prize from The International Center of Photography in 2004; the Foreign Press Club of America Award in 2003: and he was winner of the European Publishing Award, 2002. In 2003 he was shortlisted for the Citibank Prize now known as the Deutsche Böurse Prize.

He has produced four monographs of his work including 'Afghanistan: chronotopia' (2002) which was published in five languages; 'For Most Of It I Have No Words' (1998) about the landscapes of genocide and 'Bleed' (2005) about the war in Bosnia. The most recent is 'Burke+Norfolk; Photographs from the War in Afghanistan.' (2011)

He has work held in major collections such as The Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, The Getty in Los Angeles and the collection of Tate Modern.

Paul Lowe is a Senior Lecturer in Photography at the University of the Arts in London and an award-winning photographer living and working between Sarajevo and London. His work is represented by Panos Pictures, and has appeared in Time, Newsweek, Life, The Sunday Times Magazine, The Observer and The Independent. Since 2004, Lowe has been the Course Director of the Masters programme in Photojournalism and Documentary Photography at the London College of Communication. His book ‘Bosnians’, which documents 10 years of the war and post-war situation in Bosnia, was published in April 2005.

Daniel Alexander’s recent photographic practice has focused on work with archives and projects exploring the use of art, architecture and photography in commemoration. Daniel is currently completing a four-year research-led photographic project about the permanent commemoration of the 1.7 million Commonwealth War Dead, through an exploration of the design of the Commonwealth War Graves and Memorials.

Paul Lowe, Daniel Alexander and Simon Norfolk will be speaking about the Tourism of War alongside Hilary Roberts (Imperial War Museum) in The Main Lecture Theatre at UAL London College of Communication on 26 November 2014, from 14:00. After the symposium there will be a drinks reception and opportunity to view the exhibition at PARCspace. Booking essential, free and open to all.

To reserve a place for the symposium please email: r.christian@lcc.arts.ac.uk

To book for the opening party and talk please access http://events.arts.ac.uk/event/2014/11/11/The-Tourism-of-War/

This exhibition and symposium are part of PARC’s archive-mania season, October-January, 2015. With thanks to Paul Lowe and the Reprographics department at LCC.

This is a Photography and the Archive Research Centre event in association with the LCC Graduate School and LCC Photography and is part of PARC’s archive-mania season 2014-2015.
www.photographyresearchcentre.co.uk

Image Credit: Utah Beach, from the series The Normandy Beaches: We Are Making A New World, by Simon Norfolk. 

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The Tourism of War Symposium

 

The Tourism of War Symposium: Wednesday 26 November, 14:00 – 16:00.
Main Lecture Theatre, UAL London College of Communication

See Exhibition Page Here

The Tourism of War explores battlefields as spaces of memory and remembrance, becoming sites of pilgrimage for those who wish to remember or grieve. At the core of the exhibition are works from three photographers who have engaged with the ‘hollows of memory’ contained in the landscape: postcards made of the destruction of the Belgian town of Ypres during and after World War I by the Antony Brothers, and collected by Paul Lowe, the British WWI cemeteries documented by Daniel Alexander, and the D-day landing beaches photographed by Simon Norfolk. The project is curated by Paul Lowe.

Simon Norfolk is an internationally renowned landscape photographer whose work over the last ten years has been themed around a probing and stretching of the meaning of the word ‘battlefield’ in all its forms. He has photographed in some of the world’s worst war zones and refugee crises, but is ‘equally at home photographing supercomputers used to design military systems or test launches of nuclear systems.’

His work has been widely recognised: he has won Le Prix Dialogue at Les Rencontres d'Arles in 2005; The Infinity Prize from The International Center of Photography in 2004; the Foreign Press Club of America Award in 2003: and he was winner of the European Publishing Award, 2002. In 2003 he was shortlisted for the Citibank Prize now known as the Deutsche Böurse Prize.

He has produced four monographs of his work including 'Afghanistan: chronotopia' (2002) which was published in five languages; 'For Most Of It I Have No Words' (1998) about the landscapes of genocide and 'Bleed' (2005) about the war in Bosnia. The most recent is 'Burke+Norfolk; Photographs from the War in Afghanistan.' (2011)

He has work held in major collections such as The Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, The Getty in Los Angeles and the collection of Tate Modern.

Paul Lowe is a Senior Lecturer in Photography at the University of the Arts in London and an award-winning photographer living and working between Sarajevo and London. His work is represented by Panos Pictures, and has appeared in Time, Newsweek, Life, The Sunday Times Magazine, The Observer and The Independent. Since 2004, Lowe has been the Course Director of the Masters programme in Photojournalism and Documentary Photography at the London College of Communication. His book ‘Bosnians’, which documents 10 years of the war and post-war situation in Bosnia, was published in April 2005.

Daniel Alexander’s recent photographic practice has focused on work with archives and projects exploring the use of art, architecture and photography in commemoration. Daniel is currently completing a four-year research-led photographic project about the permanent commemoration of the 1.7 million Commonwealth War Dead, through an exploration of the design of the Commonwealth War Graves and Memorials.

Paul Lowe, Daniel Alexander and Simon Norfolk will be speaking about the Tourism of War alongside Hilary Roberts (Imperial War Museum) in The Main Lecture Theatre at UAL London College of Communication on 26 November 2014, from 14:00. After the symposium there will be a drinks reception and opportunity to view the exhibition at PARCspace. Booking essential, free and open to all.

To reserve a place for the symposium please email: r.christian@lcc.arts.ac.uk

To book for the opening party and talk please access http://events.arts.ac.uk/event/2014/11/11/The-Tourism-of-War/

This exhibition and symposium are part of PARC’s archive-mania season, October-January, 2015. With thanks to Paul Lowe and the Reprographics department at LCC.

This is a Photography and the Archive Research Centre event in association with the LCC Graduate School and LCC Photography and is part of PARC’s archive-mania season 2014-2015.
www.photographyresearchcentre.co.uk

Image Credit: Utah Beach, from the series The Normandy Beaches: We Are Making A New World, by Simon Norfolk.